Monday, December 31, 2012

INTERMENT RECORDS—HISTORICAL SOCIETIES


Have you visited the historical societies where your ancestors lived?  You will be surprised at all the resources you will find. For example, I visited the Clinton Historical Society in Clinton, New York (http://www.clintonhistory.org), a few years ago and was able to break through one of my brick walls as a result.

Clinton Historical Society
Among its many holdings, the Clinton Historical Society has interment records for Sunset Hill Cemetery (http://www.sunsethillcemetery.org) since its opening in 1854. There is a binder that contains more recent records as well as a bound book that contains older records.  The older book has much more information (Date, Name of Deceased, Place of Birth, Late Residence, Date of Birth, Date of Death, Marital Status, Date of Interment, Disease, Parents’ Names, Where Interred, Name of Undertaker).  I imagine that privacy laws is the reason for the lack of detail for the more recent deaths.

As with any source, it is not definitive; however, it is a great starting point.

Because I have at least 50 ancestors buried in this cemetery, these interment books were my dream come true. I knew my third great grandfather, GEORGE BOWLES, was born in England, but I did not know the identity of his parents.  Below you will see the entry for George Bowles in the Interment Book.

(1)

George Bowles was born in Kent, England; his last residence was Westmoreland, New York; and he was born on December 2, 1801.

The image below is page 2 of the record:

(2)

Here I learned that George was buried on May 31, 1891; he died of an abscess; his parents were Phineas and Dinah; he is buried in Plot D No. 17; and the undertaker was M. Tumock.

So Phineas and Dinah were his parents. Hmmm…  I took those names and performed a Google search. (“Phineas and Dinah Bowles Kent England”). Not long afterwards I found Phineas and  Dinah Bowles on the 1841 England Census. They were living with their daughter Eliza. Discovering Phineas and Dinah opened an entire new line of research for my Bowles’ line.

Even if you can’t make the trip to a historical society, be sure to check out their website. Many have a wealth of material online. For example, the Clinton Historical Society has copies of their newsletters from 2007-2012 (http://www.clintonhistory.org/newsletters.html) on their website, along with photographs of historic buildings (http://www.clintonhistory.org/photos.html).

You can also contact historical societies for assistance. Membership fees are usually nominal. Some charge for research, but some do not.

So, don’t forget historical societies as a source in your research. 

CITATION SOURCES:

(1) Sunset Hill Burial Book, Clinton Historical Society, Clinton, Oneida County, New York.

(2) Ibid.

Sunday, December 30, 2012

FUN WITH FULTON




forget sometimes about Old Fulton NY Post Cards (www.fultonhistory.com), a free database of historic New York newspapers, and how fortunate you are if you have New York ancestors.  Be warned, however, that it can suck up a huge amount of your time. You will be transfixed by all the wonderful tidbits you learn about your family. If your ancestor was a public figure, you will get more hits.

For example, today I decided that I wanted to know more about my great grand uncle, GEORGE ROBERT TAYLOR (1859-1935). In just one news article from 1926 (1) I learned:
  • He was born on a farm near  Hamilton College.
  • He attended school in Clinton, New York
  • He graduated from the Medical College at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 1888
  • He began the practice of medicine in the fall of 1888
  • In August of 1888 he married Agnes Bryden.
  • They lived in Oriskany, New York, until the fall of 1894 and moved to Clinton, New York, in November.
  • Two children were born to them in Oriskany:  BESSIE TAYLOR (Mrs. Clarence W. Chaney at the date of the article) and BAYARD TAYLOR (my 1st cousins 2X removed). 
  • Bayard lived in Jacksonville, Illinois, at the date the article.
  • The people in the Clinton area were fond of Dr. Taylor; he worked long hours and was devoted to his patients.

  • He was President of Clinton twice and Trustee four times.
  • He was a member of the Board of Education for several years.
  • He was Oneida County Coroner for four years.
  • He was trustee of the Stone Church in Clinton.
  • He belonged to the Clinton Lodge and the Stone Church.
  • He was instrumental in building Hamilton College, Marvin and Chestnut Streets and Kirkland Avenue.
  • The first telephone in the village was in his home, and his house was the first in the village to be wired for electricity.
  • He was instrumental in building the Clinton Town Hall.
  • Dr. Taylor’s home was the scene of a novel published about 1880 Helen’s Babies by John Habberton (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helen's_Babies). At the time the novel was written, Mr. Habberton was a resident of the house. (2)
  • He retired in 1926 and planned to spend the winters in Florida.
  • His practice was taken over by Dr. Arthur H. Cummings.
In addition, the article contained a nice shot of his handsome face.

As if that article did not give me enough information, I headed for more.  I found a fabulous picture of Dr. Taylor and his family sitting in their brand new Paige car in the driveway of their home in Clinton in 1906. (3)  I learned that he had a new Jordan sedan in 1926. (4)


An 1893 advertisement called Dr. George R. Taylor “The Rupture Specialist.” The ad claimed that one hundred cases had been cured in Utica, New York. (5)


But all was not perfect for Dr. Taylor. I read about two lawsuits where he was involved. One involved a Hamilton College student who alleged mistreatment of a broken thumb in 1907. (6)  Another was a lawsuit in 1912: Mary E. Crandall vs. Dr. George Taylor. (7) The irony is that I think Mary E. Crandall is also one of my ancestors.  I guess suing doctors happened in the olden days too.

And, finally, there was an article on May 16, 1935, that declared that Dr. Taylor had died at his home in Clinton on Saturday, May 11.  In this article I learned that his specialty had been the treatment of hernias. In addition, I discovered that he had been a Republication in politics and he was a Presbyterian. For fun, he would spend summers at Thousand Island Park on the St. Lawrence River.  At the time of his death he had one grandson, HOWARD W. CHANEY, my 2 cousin 1X removed. (8)

In an article dated October 22, 1975, I learned that the late Howard Chaney had donated $5,000 to the Village of Clinton in memory of his grandfather, Dr. George Taylor. (9)


I now have a real image of my great grand uncle. He is not just a statistic. If you have New York ancestors, I suggest that you visit Old Fulton NY Post Cards (and by the way it covers all of New York, not just Fulton).  There is a FAQ Help Index on the site that will give you tips for searching.  I use a variety of searches (Boolean, exact phrase and all the words). Your strategy depends on the type of information you are trying to retrieve.  Common names can be a problem because you get too many hits, so add some specifics about someone’s life if you can (address, spouse’s name, etc.).

On the home page, click on VIEW FULTON HISTORICAL PHOTOS and you will see an assortment of information.  One button I pressed was called “Old New York Church Records 1804 – 1950.” Another button had pictures of deeds. One contained Oswego County Probate Records.  Another had cemetery records.

OldFulton NY Post Cards is a fun site. You will see that as soon as you pull it up on the Internet. You will hear piano music and see a swimming fish, who occasionally sticks his tongue out at you. Click the Enter button and get lost for hours!



ILLUSTRATIONS BY:

Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, New York, Electronic Clip Art, 1200 Ornamental Letters, 2007.

Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, New York, Electronic Clip Art, Advertising Cuts of the 20s and 30s, 2003.

Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, New York, Electronic Clip Art, Full-Color Old-Time Vignettes, 2002.

Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, New York, Electronic Clip Art, 1100 Pictorial Symbols, 2007. 

CITATION SOURCES

(1) “Dr. George R. Taylor Retires After 40 Years,” The Clinton Courier, November 24, 1926 , p.1, Old Fulton NY Post Cards, digital image 618558 (http://fultonhistory.com/newspapers%207/Clinton%20Courier/Clinton%20NY%20Courier%201926%20-%201927%20Grayscale.pdf/Clinton%20NY%20Courier%201926%20-%201927%20Grayscale%20-%200365.pdf: accessed December 29, 2012).
and
“Dr. George R. Taylor Retires After 40 Years,” The Clinton Courier, November 24, 1926, p. 4, digital image 568862, Old Fulton NY Post Cards (www.fultonhistory.com).

(2) Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helen's_Babies_(novel)), “Helen’s Babies (novel),” rev. 6 July 2012.

(3) “Family Portrait,” the Clinton Courier, April 26, 1978, p. 5, digital image 525889, Old Fulton NY Post Cards (www.fultonhistory.com).

(4) “Additional Personals,” The Clinton Courier, April 26, 1926, digital image 731673, Old Fulton NY Post Cards (www.fultonhistory.com).

(5) “Are You Ruptured: Dr. George R. Taylor, The Rupture Specialist,” Utica NY Weekly Herald, March 14, 1893, digital image 335803, Old Fulton NY Post Cards (www.fultonhistory.com).

(6) “Student Sues A Physician,” Utica NY Herald Dispatch, December 3, 1907, digital image 318363, Old Fulton NY Post Cards (www. Fultonhistory.com).

(7) “Prisoners in Court,” Utica NY Daily Sentinel, June 10, 1912, digital image 1313374, Old Fulton NY Post Cards (www.fultonhistory.com).

(8) “Dr. George Taylor,” Waterville NY Times, May 16, 1935, digital image 673885, Old Fulton NY Post Cards (www. fultonhistory.com).

(9) “Recess,” The Courier, October 22, 1975, digital image 559033, Old Fulton NY Post Cards (www.fultonhistory.com).


Thursday, December 27, 2012

PAINTING THE FACELESS


While browsing through a basket of items I brought home after my mother passed away several years ago, I found the following faceless baby she had painted in her later years. She most likely planned to put a face on the child, but she grew ill and could no longer paint.

Artwork by
Jane Williams Cutler Taylor

It occurred to me that we, as genealogists and family historians, are face painters.  There are countless unknown faces out there waiting to be discovered, brought back to life, and put on our trees.  We find joy in finding a new ancestor and learning the details of their lives. If we are lucky enough to find a picture, we’re in Heaven.

My New Year’s wish for all of you out there is that you find many ancestors next year, paint their faces splendidly and place them proudly on your family trees!



Tuesday, December 25, 2012

CHRISTMAS BABY—WINIFRED OWEN


I thought I would highlight my great grand aunt, WINIFRED OWEN, today because she was born on December 25, 1858 in Holyhead, Wales.  Here is a news article I found in one of my mom’s scrapbooks. Unfortunately, there was no notation as to what paper printed this article, so I apologize for not citing it.


I found Winifred on the 1900 U.S. Census living in Weathersfield, Trumbull, Ohio with her husband John Williams and her daughter LEAH WILLIAMS, my first cousin 2x removed. (1) I also located her on the 1910 U.S. Census living in the same place with her husband. (2)

According to the 1900 U.S. Census, Winifred immigrated to this country in 1875. (3) She was only 17.

Winifred’s sister was my great grandmother, JANE OWEN (1860-1941). Here is a picture of Winifred and Jane. Aren’t you glad those hats are out of style?


Winifred Owen and Jane Owen

There was the following handwritten note in my mother’s scrapbook:

“They weren’t orphans. Their mother died young but their father was a Methodist minister. Aunt Winnie came to America first from Wales and settled in Ohio. She had a daughter, Leah, who married and lives in Pittsburgh. My grandmother came later and settled in New York Mills and then Utica.”

Unfortunately, there is a section of the scrapbook that is missing. Then it continues:

“My grandmother worked at an Inn – sort of as a chambermaid for an aunt, or some such relative. In America they prospered. Both had good husbands, saved their money and lived to a good old age.” (4)

I thank God every day for my mom’s appreciation for family history!

On the Ohio Death Certificate Index (http://ohsweb.ohiohistory.org/death), I found:

(5)

From Jane Owen’s marriage certificate I learned that Jane and Winifred’s father was ROBERT OWEN. (6) I was able to locate the family on the 1861 England Wales & Scotland Census, but that’s all I know for now. The Welsh repetitive naming system is tricky.

Who out there is having difficulty with Welsh research?  The names I am grappling with are Williams, Lewis, Owen and Pritchard. I would love to hear about your hits and misses.

Here are some sources for Welsh research:
  • The Surnames of Wales by John & Sheila Rowlands, Baltimore, Maryland, Genealogical Publishing Company, 1996.
  • Wales Genealogy Links (http://www.genealogylinks.net/uk/wales/index.html)
  • Welsh Family History, Second Edition, edited by John & Sheila Rowlands, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1998.


I wish all my readers a Happy Holiday!



ILLUSTRATIONS BY:

Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, New York, Electronic Clip Art, "Full-Color Holiday Vignettes," 2001.

CITATION SOURCES:

(1) 1900 U.S. Census, Trumbull County, Ohio, population schedule, Weathersfield, Enumeration District (ED) 0125, sheet 1, p. 1B (stamped), dwelling 22, family 23, Winnifred Williams; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed December 25, 2012), citing National Archives microfilm publication T623, 1854 rolls.

(2)   1910 U.S. Census, Trumbull County, Ohio, population schedule, Weathersfield, Enumeration District (ED) 0240, sheet 73, p. 7B (stamped), dwelling 60, family 63, Winefred Williams; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed December 25, 2012), citing National Archives microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls.

(3) Op. cit., 1900 Census.

(4) Scrapbook entry by Jane Williams Cutler Taylor. Current location of scrapbook: home of Karin Hadden.

(5)  Ohio Death Certificate Index, The Ohio Historical Society, (http://ohsweb.ohiohistory.org/death//results.cfm: accessed December 25, 2012).

(6) Certificate of Marriage, William Williams and Jane Owen, 15 September 1880, New Tabernacle Chapel, County of Anglesey, Wales, Entry No. 100. 










Monday, December 24, 2012

CALEB CLARKE MAGRUDER--GENEALOGIST / WRITER


I found him, I found the person in my family tree with whom I can truly bond! That person is Caleb Clarke Magruder, III.  While quietly adding Magruders, one of my Scottish lines, to my tree today, I came upon CALEB CLARKE MAGRUDER, III, my 6th cousin 1x removed. Caleb was born February 20, 1870 in Prince George’s County, Maryland; he died on August 22, 1946. According to Find A Grave, although Caleb was well equipped to practice law, “he preferred to spend his life in the assembling of historical and genealogical data, and authorship.” (1)


Some of his numerous publications include:
  • “Colonel Joseph Belt : born in Anne Arundel County, Maryland, 1680, died in Prince George's County, Maryland, 1761,” published by Advertiser-Republican Print, Annapolis, 1909
(try www.worldcat.org)
  • Colonel Ninian Beall published by The Society of Colonial Wars in the District of Columbia, 1911

  • Dr. William Beanes, the Incidental Cause of the Authorship of the Star-spangled Banner

  • Descendants of Isaac Magruder, Revolutionary Soldier, American Clan Gregor Society, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1929
(try www.worldcat.org)
  • Enoch Louis Lowe, Governor of Maryland, 1851-54, Extracted from the Year-Book of the American Clan Gregor Society, 1909 and 1910
  • Nathaniel Magruder of "Dunblane,” Richmond, Virginia: Appeals Press, 1917.

  • Nathan Magruder of "Knave's Dispute,” Extracted from the Yearbook of the American Clan Gregor Society, 1915.

  • Thomas George Pratt, Governor of Maryland, 1845-1848; United States Senator, 1850-1857, Extracted from the Yearbook of the American Clan Gregor, Baltimore, Maryland, Waverly Press, 1913.

  • Year Book of American Clan Gregor Society, Baltimore, Maryland, The Waverly Press, 1913.

Caleb Clarke Magruder was born at Upper Marlboro, Prince George’s County, Maryland; son of Caleb Clarke and Elizabeth Rice (Nalle) Magruder. He was educated at Loyola College; A.B. 1891; A.M., 1898; M.A. Columbian, 1899; LL.B. Georgetown University; D.C. 1897. He worked as a Teller at the United States Treasury Department. (2)

In the "U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925" database on Ancestry.com, I found Caleb’s passport application dated 22 Aug 1895. He was traveling alone and intended to return to the country in one year. His occupation was listed as Teller.  I learned that he was 5’ 8” tall with brown eyes and light brown hair. He had a fair complexion and a mustache. (3)


I found a number of references to Caleb Clarke Magruder on Genealogybank.com. One article entitled “Annual Gathering of the American Clan Gregor”  discussed the festivities at the American Clan Gregor gathering in Washington, D.C. in 1910. Poems were read and songs were sung at the event. There were approximately 150 descendants of the original members of Clan Gregor of Scotland. Caleb C. Magruder read a “greetings” cablegram from Perthshire, Scotland, the home of the original clan. (4)

 Another article on Genealogybank.com entitled “Maryland Magruders There: American Clan Gregor to Affiliate with Scottish Association” listed numerous attendees at the event in 1911, a number of them are on my family tree. A gavel was presented that night to Caleb Clark Magruder. (5)

After reading all this material, I am feeling very Scottish!



ILLUSTRATIONS BY:

Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, New York, Electronic Clip Art, Full-Color Old-Time Vignettes, 2002.

Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, New York, Electronic Clip Art, Advertising Cuts of the 20s and 30s, 2003.

Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, New York, Electronic Clip Art, East Meets West Art Deco Motifs, 2010.

"Sidney R. Ellis' Bonnie Scotland," The Strobridge Lith Co, c1895; Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress (http://www.loc.gov: accessed December 24, 2012).

CITATION SOURCES:

(1) Find A Grave, Inc., Find A Grave, digital image (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GScid=2292435&GRid=39444473&: accessed December 24, 2012), "Caleb Clarke Magruder, III (1870-1946), Memorial # 39444473, created by Margaret.

(2) "Colonial Families of the United States, Vol. I" database, Ancestry.com (http://search.ancestry.com/Browse/BookView.aspx?dbid=48546&iid=ColonialFamiliesI-000567-348: accessed December 24, 2012), entry for Caleb Clarke Magruder, extracted from "Colonial Families of the United States, Vol. I.," edited by George Norbury MacKenzie, LL.B., Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, 1912, p. 348.

(3) "U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925" database, Ancestry.com (http://search.ancestry.com/iexec?htx=View&r=an&dbid=1174&iid=USM1372_453-0802&fn=Caleb+Clark&ln=Magruder&st=r&ssrc=pt_t49405475_p20265319397&pid=1252921: accessed December 24, 2012), entry for Caleb Clark Magruder, Jr., extracted from National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); Washington D.C.; Passport Applications, 1795-1905; Collection Number: ARC Identifier 566612 / MLR Number A1 508; NARA Series: M1372; Roll #: 453.

            (4) "Annual Gathering of the American Clan Gregor," Evening Star, October 28, 1910, digital image, GenealogyBank.com (http://www.genealogybank.com: accessed December 24, 2012), citing original p. 16.

(5) "Maryland Magruders There. American Clan Gregor to Affliate  with Scottish Association, Sun (Baltimore, MD), October 28, 1911, digital image, GenealogyBank.com (http://www.genealogybank.com: accessed December 24, 2012), citing original page 13.

Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Monday, December 17, 2012

FINDING CLERGY IN YOUR FAMILY TREE


Have you run across ministers, priests or rabbis in your ancestor pursuit?  I have found several ministers on my maternal side.  For this post I am going to concentrate on REV. THOMAS HISCOX (1686-1773), my 8th great grandfather. Using The Colonial Clergy and the Colonial Churches of New England by Frederick Lewis Weiss, I discovered the following information about Rev. Hiscox:
  • He was the son of Rev. William Hiscox
  • He was a Baptist
  • He was a colleague of Rev. Joseph Maxson
And the timeline of his life:
  • 1686 - b.  Newport, Rhode Island
  • 1709 - Freeman
  • 1712-1772 - Town Treasurer
  • 1714-1741 - Deputy 
  • 1716 - Deacon
  • 1716 – Church Clerk
  • 1727 - Ordained in Westerly, RI
  • 1727-1773 - Settled as minister in Westerly, RI
  • November 26, 1773 – died                         (1)


Next I went to GenealogyBank (www.genealogybank.com) to see if I could find news articles on Rev. Thomas Hiscox.  By searching for his name in the Rhode Island newspapers, I got nine hits. The first hit was an obituary. Here I learned that he was 87 when he died in Westerly and that he had been a minister of the Sabbatarian Church for nearly 40 years.  (2)  Some of the other hits were referring to different people named Thomas Hiscox, possibly Rev. Thomas’ son, Thomas Hiscox, my 7th great grand uncle. The last search result was interesting as it mentioned that Rev. Thomas Hiscox was a genius with a prodigious memory who possessed humility and charity and “he walked in all the ways of the Lord, blameless.” (3)

I then broadened my search on GenealogyBank to include other states, such as Massachusetts. Here I  found a picture of Rev. Thomas Hiscox along with a few sentences about him and the history of the portrait by Robert Feke, which belonged to Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt. (4)

This is a good example of why you should search for news articles about your ancestors in states other than just their home state!

Next I decided to search for Rev. Thomas Hiscox on Ancestry.com. Here I found him mentioned in the database The First Hundred Years: Pawcatuck Seventh Day Baptist Church, Westerly, Rhode Island, 1840-1940. This excerpt stated that Rev. Thomas Hiscox was for 60 years Treasurer of the Town of Westerly. It also discussed his father, REV. WILLIAM HISCOX, my 9th great grandfather, who was the first pastor of the first Seventh Day Baptist Church in America at Newport.  Rev. William Hiscox had many descendants in the Barkers, Clarkes, Saunders, Hiscoxes, Rogers and others.  (5)

In addition, I found on Ancestry.com, attached to a Public Member Tree, the same portrait that was in the Boston newspaper. However, this one was in color.  In the database U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900, I saw that Thomas Hiscox married Bethiah Clarke in 1703 in Rhode Island. (6)

In the Dedication of Ministers' Monument : Aug. 28, 1899 database on Ancestry.com, I learned about the monument erected as a memorial to the early pastors of the Second Seventh-day Baptist Church in America, including Thomas Hiscox. The memorial marks the spot where the meeting house stood from 1680 to 1852. It is by the Pawcatuck River, where for years many people were baptized while the entire congregation stood watching. (7)

There are countless other sources (land transactions, stories, Census records, etc.) on Ancestry.com about Rev. Thomas Hiscox and his father.



I then went to Westerly (Rhode Island) and Its Witnesses: For Two Hundred and Fifty Years, 1626-1876 (1878), which I have on CD.  Here I learned that Rev. Thomas Hiscox was married at the age of seventeen to Bethia Clarke and united with the Newport church at the age of twenty. He then moved to Westerly. Among his other duties at Westerly, he was justice of the peace. When he died, the church had 548 members. (8)

My final stop was Find A Grave (www.findagrave.com). Here I found a picture of the monument and commemorative plaque that mentions Rev. Thomas Hiscox. This website also gave me the date of his marriage and the names and birthdates of his children. It stated that Thomas was the fourth pastor of the Sabbatarian Church of Westerly, Rhode Island. He is buried in the First Hopkinton Cemetery in Washington County, Rhode Island. (9)


In summary, there is plenty of information out there about the clergy.  If you have clergy in your tree, in addition to the sources I have mentioned, you might consult:
  • City directories
  • Church histories
  • Google books
  • Familysearch.org (catalog)

The following are some publications I found that list people who chose the clergy life. Some of these publications are out of copyright and therefore free on the Internet. If you don’t see a link under a book that you want to order, try locating it on WorldCat.org, Amazon.com, FamilySearch.org , Ebay.com or Genealogical.com.
  • Ackman and Ziff Family Genealogy Institute, Center for Jewish History, "Rabbinical Genealogy: Sources at the Center for Jewish History." Last modified 2011. Accessed December 17, 2012. http://researchguides.cjh.org/Rabbis.pdf
  • Glatfelter, Charles Henry. Pastors and People: German Lutheran and Reformed Churches in the Pennsylvania Field, 1717-1793. Pennsylvania German Society: Breinigsville, Pennsylvania, 1981.
  • Goodwin, Edward Lewis. The Colonial Church in Virginia: With Biographical Sketches of the First Six Bishops of the Diocese of Virginia, and Other Historical Papers, Together with Brief Biographical Sketches of the Colonial Clergy of Virginia. Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Morehouse, 1927.
  • Kanely, Edna A. Directory of Ministers and the Maryland Churches They Served, 1634-1990. Westminster, Maryland: Willow Bend Books, 1991.
  • Simpson, William Samuel. Virginia Baptist Ministers, 1760-1790: A Biographical Survey. Richard, Virginia: W.S. Simpson, Jr., 1990.
  • Taylor, James Barnett. Virginia Baptist Ministers, 1804-1871. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: J. B. Lippincot, 1859.
  • Weis, Frederick Lewis. The Colonial Clergy of Maryland, Delaware, and Georgia . Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1978.
  • Weis, Frederick Lewis. The Colonial Clergy of the Middle Colonies: New York New Jersey and Pennsylvania 1628-1776. Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1978.
  • Weis, Frederick Lewis. The Colonial Clergy of Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2005.
  • Wise, Jennings C., and William Meade. Wise's Digested Index and Genealogical Guide to Bishop Meade's Old Churches, Ministers and Families of Virginia, Embracing 6,900 Proper Names. Richmond, Virginia: Lippincott, 1910. http://archive.org/details/wisesdigestedind00wise


ILLUSTRATIONS BY:

Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, New York, Electronic Clip Art, Old-Fashioned Silhouettes, 2001.

Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, New York, Electronic Clip Art, Christian Symbols, 2003.

CITATION SOURCES:

(1) The Colonial Clergy and the Colonial Churches of New England by Frederick Lewis Weis, Reprinted for Clearfield Company by Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, Maryland, 1936.

(2) GenealogyBank, Saturday, June 5, 1773, Paper: Providence Gazette (Providence, RI), Volume: X   Issue: 491, Page: 3, NewsBank and/or the American Antiquarian Society. 2004.(http://www.genealogybank.com: accessed December 16, 2012).

(3) GenealogyBank.com, Monday, May 31, 1773, Paper: Newport Mercury (Newport, RI)   Issue: 76, NewsBank and/or the American Antiquarian Society. 2004. (http://www.genealogybank.com: accessed December 16, 2012).

(4) GenealogyBank.com, Sunday, July 19, 1931, Paper: Boston Herald (Boston, MA), Page: 61  NewsBank and/or the American Antiquarian Society. 2004. (http://www.genealogybank.com: accessed December 16, 2012).

(5) Ancestry.com. The first hundred years : Pawcatuck Seventh Day Baptist Church, Westerly, Rhode Island, 1840-1940. [database on-line]. Provo, UT: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005.
Original data: The first hundred years : Pawcatuck Seventh Day Baptist Church, Westerly, Rhode Island, 1840-1940.. Westerly, R.I.: The Utter Co., 1940.

(6) Record for Thomas Hiscox, Source number: 19953.000; Source type: Electronic Database; Number of Pages: 1; Submitter Code: BFO.
Yates Publishing. U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.

(7) Dedication of Minister's Monument, Aug. 28, 1899, Author: First Hopkinton Cemetery Association (R.I., First Hopkinton Cemetery Association, Mary Bassett Clarke, First Hopkinton Cemetery Association (R.I.), Publisher: printed for the Association by the American Sabbath Tract Society, 1899 (http://archive.org/details/dedicationminis00unkngoog: accessed December 16, 2012).

(8) Westerly (Rhode Island) and Its Witnesses: For Two Hundred and Fifty Years, 1626-1876 by Frederic Denison, Publisher: J.A. & R.A. Reid, 1878, CD-ROM, p. 62.

(9) Find A Grave, Inc., Find A Grave, digital image (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed December 17, 2012),  “memorial for Rev. Thomas Hiscox (1686-1773), Memorial No. 29211911, created by Superkentman, photograph added by Jane Ferner Lawrence.





Thursday, December 13, 2012

ANCESTORHUNT.COM


ou just never know what you will find online. Some time ago I was Googling one of my surnames—Bowles—and discovered by accident the website Ancestor Hunt (www.ancestorhunt.com). Here I found on the Warren/Wooster Family Bible page (http://www.ancestorhunt.com/warren-wooster-genealogy-bible.htm) several entries for Bowles, Ford, Scripture and Taylor, four of my family surnames. (1) (Clarissa Wooster was the third wife of George P. Bowles, my second great grand uncle.)  As an added touch, there was a transcription of the entries concerning the Bowles’ family in the 1880 U.S. Federal Census for Westmoreland, Oneida County, New York.



On the Warren Bible Records and Genealogy Page (http://www.ancestorhunt.com/warren-wooster-bible-records.htm), I was able to see actual pages from the Warren/Wooster family bible. There was also a copy of the obituary of Mrs. Mark Scripture, my 2nd great grandmother, and two handwritten sheets of notebook paper (http://www.ancestorhunt.com/images/Family%20Record.jpg) containing  birth dates, marriage information, dates of death and dates that my ancestors joined the Presbyterian Church of Vernon Center, New York. What a windfall!  On this same page, I learned from a news article how Alonzo DeLand, my 1st cousin 3X removed, drowned while swimming away from a burning boat in Syracuse, New York. (2)

This is a good example of how you can find valuable information on your ancestors by looking at records of what you might think are unrelated folks-- in this case a third wife of a second great grand uncle. I have found this to be the case in surname histories in particular.

How fortunate I am to have stumbled on all this material.  Be sure to check out the Family Bible Master Surname Index at Ancestor Hunt (http://www.ancestorhunt.com/family_bibles_index.htm) to see if any of your ancestors are mentioned.

Incidentally, Ancestor Hunt is loaded with links to genealogical information. I have only addressed one small portion of the website.



ILLUSTRATIONS BY:

Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, New York, Electronic Clip Art, 1200 Ornamental Letters, 2007.

Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, New York, Electronic Clip Art, Victorian Goods and Merchandise, 2006.

Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, New York, Electronic Clip Art, Elegant Floral Designs, 2003.

CITATION SOURCES:

(1) Warren/Wooster Family Bible page, Ancestor Hunt Free Genealogy, 2002-2012 (http://www.ancestorhunt.com/warren-wooster-genealogy-bible.htm: accessed December 13, 2012).

(2) Warren Bible Records and Genealogy Page, Ancestor Hunt Free Genealogy, 2002-2012 (http://www.ancestorhunt.com/warren-wooster-bible-records.htm: accessed December 13, 2012)


Monday, December 10, 2012

NASTY DEATHS

Would you want to die of worms? That’s what poor Rhoda Crandall died of in 1848 in Columbus, Chenango County, New York (http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nychenan/columbs1.htm). (1) Yuk!  I don’t know yet if Rhoda is one of my Crandalls.



How about “dropsy of brain”? What the heck! That is what Manasseh Lloyd died of in 1848. (2)Apparently, dropsy is edema, so dropsy of the brain must be swelling of the brain. (I don’t have any Lloyds in my tree to my knowledge.)
And what is marasmus? That was the affliction of James Olney, who died in 1849. (3) After doing a bit of Internet sleuthing, I discovered that marasmus is a form of severe malnutrition, usually occurring in young children (http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/marasmus). (4) I do have Olneys in my tree, but I’m not sure if this James is mine.



Do you have ancestors who died of strange diseases?  Here are some websites where you can learn more about their conditions:
  1. Old Medical Terminology, Rootsweb, Ancestry.com, (http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~usgwkidz/oldmedterm.htm)
  2. Old Medical Terms for use by Genealogists, Joseph G. Court, 2000-2012 (http://freepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~wakefield/definitions/defmedic.html)
  3. Glossary of Medical Terms Used in the 18th and 19th Centuries, Craig Thornber, Cheshire, England, UK (http://www.thornber.net/medicine/html/medgloss.html)
  4. Rudy’s List of Archaic Medical Terms, 2005-2012 (http://www.antiquusmorbus.com)
  5. Sickness and Death in the Old South, A List of Medical Terms, 2002-2008, TNGenNet, TNGenWeb Inc. (http://www.tngenweb.org/darkside/medical-terms.html)
  6. Glossary of Ancient Diseases, The Olive Tree Genealogy created by Lorine McGinnis Schulze (http://www.olivetreegenealogy.com/misc/disease.shtml)

Or, if you want your very own book about this subject, try:
  • A Medical Miscellany for Genealogists by Dr. Jeanette L. Jerger,2009 (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0788403753)

I don’t know about you, but I want to die of old age like Anna Streeter did in 1849 (5) No worms, no dropsy….



ILLUSTRATIONS BY:

Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, New York, Electronic Clip Art, 1100 Pictorial Symbols, 2007.

CITATION SOURCES:
(1) Town of Columbus, Deaths Reported in the Year 1848, P. 36, Rootsweb, page maintained by Tim Stowell, Chattanooga, TN (http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nychenan/columbs1.htm: accessed December 10, 2012).
(2) Town of Columbus, Deaths Reported in the Year 1849, P. 37, Rootsweb, page maintained by Tim Stowell, Chattanooga, TN (http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nychenan/columbs1.htm: accessed December 10, 2012).
(3) Ibid, p. 37.
(4) The Free Dictionary by Farlex, Inc., 2012 (http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/marasmus: accessed December 10, 2012).
(5) Town of Columbus, Deaths Reported in the Year 1849, op. cit., p. 37

Sunday, December 9, 2012

COUSINS, COUSINS, COUSINS


finally uploaded my tree to Ancestry.com and linked it to my DNA results. Technology today is mindboggling!  Within minutes I discovered several people who have shared ancestors. Ancestry.com does the work for you—it compares your match’s tree with yours and then lists the similarities. 

These are some of my ancestors from my father’s side who were direct matches with other Ancestry.com DNA participants:










(It sure looks like I had plenty of DNA from my father!)

I also got a direct match on my mother’s side for Anna Haseltine.



There were also several people who had similar surnames in the correct geographical locations. I now have to do a little investigating and perhaps broaden out my tree to discover our direct matches.
  • There was one person with Cutlers in their tree (my mother’s side).

  • Another person had the surnames Lewis and Owen (my mother’s side).

  • A number of people had the surnames Beall and/or Magruder in St. George’s County, Maryland (my father’s side).

  • One person had the surnames Rice, Stone and Haynes (my mother’s side).

I now plan to e-mail each match and exchange information. Not only do I have new cousins, but I will be able to exchange information about our mutual ancestors. Who knows what discoveries await.

Another benefit of having your DNA tested is it gives you one more piece of evidence for your research.  It is one thing to have records indicating someone is an ancestor, but it really strikes home when you find another living person who is a DNA match with that ancestor.

If you haven’t gotten your DNA tested through Ancestry.com (http://dna.ancestry.com), you are missing an incredible opportunity! And the fun never stops. Ancestry e-mails you new matches all the time. Some people like to fish, others like to hunt deer. I like to find ancestors!





ILLUSTRATIONS BY:

Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, New York, Electronic Clip Art, 1200 Ornamental Letters, 2007.

Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, New York, Electronic Clip Art, 1100 Pictorial Symbols, 2007.

SHARED ANCESTRY HINTS FROM:

AncestryDNA Results for Karin Hadden at www.ancestry.com: accessed December 9, 2012.

Tuesday, December 4, 2012

THANK YOU, MOM AND DAD

Confederate
Sharpshooter


Thank you, Mom and Dad, for giving me a diversified heritage that provides me with hours of genealogical discoveries. Thanks, Dad, for your Southern ancestors so I will have Confederate as well as Mom’s Union soldiers in my tree. 

Union Soldier


Thanks too, Dad, for giving me the Scots-Irish ancestors in Ontario so I will have an excuse to explore the records of Canada, Ireland and Scotland. Thanks also, Dad, for the French Huguenots. And thanks, Mom, for your Welsh ancestors from Holyhead. And, Mom, I love researching your Puritan line in New England.



If only I had known when I was growing up about all these treasures, I would have asked more questions. Fortunately, I learned later about the amazing people who came before me, the long line of gutsy people who were not afraid to venture into a foreign land or state.


When I read about my 7th great grand uncle, CAPTAIN MOSES RICE, who was tomahawked and scalped by the Algonquin Indians in Massachusetts, I cried for him and his family. When I learned about my 2nd great grandfather, AARON CUTLER, dying in Harrisburg during the Civil War and his family having his body carted back to New York, I hurt.  When I discovered that my grand uncle, WILLIAM WILLIAMS, was killed by a train in Rome, New York, I wept for him and his family, who had lost their  other son, ROBERT WILLIAMS, just a year before from typhoid fever. And I felt sorrow for my grand aunt ELLA TAYLOR and her daughter, RENA TAYLOR, my 1st cousin 1x removed, who died of TB back in the early 1900s.



On the other hand, when I think of my 2nd great grandfather, RICHARD WILLIAMS, working as a mariner off the rocky coast of Wales, I get chills of excitement. And I wonder what it was like for my 3rd great grandfather, JOHN TAYLOR, running the Nag’s Head Inn in Lincolnshire, England.  And when I imagine my BEAN ancestors being the first permanent settlers in Tennessee, I am proud.


The many stories, the lives I can only piece together with the remaining records, are longing to be told. I hear their voices crying to me, asking me to celebrate their existence, and I intend to do just that!

ILLUSTRATIONS BY:

Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, New York, Electronic Clip Art, Civil War Illustrations, 2003.

Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, New York, Electronic Clip Art, American Historical Illustrations and Emblems, 2001.

Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, New York, Electronic Clip Art, Old-Fashioned Nautical Illustrations, 2002.

Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, New York, Electronic Clip Art, 1100 Pictorial Symbols, 2007.

Saturday, December 1, 2012

NEW HAMPSHIRE OBITS ON FAMILYSEARCH.ORG

fter reading the Nutfield Genealogy post dated November 29, 2012 entitiled “Find NH Town Clerk Records On Line” (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2012/11/find-nh-town-clerk-records-on-line.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+NutfieldGenealogy+%28Nutfield+Genealogy%29), I was inspired to check out  the FamilySearch website’s New Hampshire Historical Records Collection (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/list#page=1&countryId=41).  I have a number of Spaulding ancestors who were from New Hampshire.


The first database I checked was New Hampshire, Hillsborough County, Manchester, Cemetery Records, 1800-2007, Obituaries. There I found fairly recent obituaries for several Spauldings. Here is a summary of my findings:

KAY ADAMS SPAULDING
  • Kay died in 2003
  • Her husband’s name was Kenneth and he predeceased her.
  • The names of her son and two grandsons are included.
  • The Rev. Frank Irvine performed the service
  • Kay is buried in Pine Grove Cemetery in Manchester.  (1)

KENNETH C. SPAULDING
  • Kenneth died in 2001.
  • His parents were Clarence W. and E. Belle (Hesseltine) Spaulding.
  • He served in World War II. 
  • He worked for the New Hampshire Department of Transportation and Navy Bureau of Yards and Docks, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Postal Service, and he owned his own poultry farm.
  • He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and the American Legion.
  • The names of his wife and son are included.
  • He is buried in Pine Grove Cemetery in Manchester. (2)

CHARLOTTE SPAULDING
  • Charlotte died in 2007.
  • Her husband, Edward Spaulding, died in 1977.
  • The names of her children and grandchildren are listed.
  • A photograph of Charlotte is included. (3)

CHARLES W. SPAULDING
  • Charles died in 2006.
  • His parents were Clarence and Dorothy (Lambert) Spaulding.
  • He was a member of Grace Church Episcopal.
  • His wife of 57 years was Juliette A. (Noury) Spaulding.
  • His children’s and grandchildren’s names are included. It also refers to a sister, nieces and nephews.
  • He is buried in Pine Grove Cemetery in Manchester. (4)


HENRY W. SPAULDING
  • Henry died in 2006.
  • Wallis and Florence (Knight) Spaulding were his parents.
  • He had a distinguished military record and served in World War II.
  • He was former president of the Indian Head Shoe Company in Manchester, New Hampshire, and  the former President of the Daniel Webster Council of the Boy Scouts of America.
  • He was a member of the Manchester Historical Society and the Currier Art Gallery.
  • He was a 32nd degree Mason, Bektash Shriner.
  • He was a member of the Founders and Patriots of America and the Sons of the American Revolution.
  • The names of his family members are listed.
  • He is buried in Pine Grove Cemetery in Manchester.
  • The obituary had Henry’s picture. (5)


THOMAS J. SPAULDING
  • Thomas died in 1998.
  • He was the former principal at Trinity High School.
  • Thomas G. and Elizabeth (McNabe-Brown) Spaulding were his parents.
  •  He was a veteran of World War II and the Korean and Vietnam Wars.
  • The obituary lists his family members as well as the church he attended.
  • His photograph was included. (6)

Wow!  The research avenues I can take now are many.  There are references to cemeteries, churches, fraternal organizations, military service, employers, family members and historical associations.   I suspect that some of the Spauldings in these obituaries are cousins.

I noted with interest that Henry Spaulding was a member of the Sons of the American Revolution.  Some of my Spauldings were in the American Revolution also. I entered the name Henry W.  Spaulding, resident of New Hampshire with a father named Wallis, into Ancestry.com.  Using Census and birth records, I was able to trace back past Henry’s father, Wallis, to Henry’s grandfather, Henry, and then back to Abel Spalding. It turns out that the Henry W. Spaulding was my 5th cousin 2X removed. So now I have greatly broadened my family tree and, in addition, I have a picture of Henry!  Not bad for a day’s work!

I now intend to investigate some of the other Spauldings I found and see if they are cousins.  I might even attempt to track down the living descendants using search engines such was ZabaSearch (http://www.zabasearch.com).


ILLUSTRATIONS BY:

Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, New York, Electronic Clip Art, 1200 Ornamental Letters, 2007.

Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, New York, Electronic Clip Art, Advertising Cuts of the 20s and 30s, 2003.

Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, New York, Electronic Clip Art, American Historical Illustrations and Emblems, 2001.

CITATION SOURCES:

(1) "New Hampshire, Hillsborough County, Manchester, Cemetery Records, 1800-2007:  digital images FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org: accessed 1 December 2012).  Kay Adams Spaulding.  Feb. 22, 2003; citing Cemetery Records. Obituaries, Abbott, Arnold L.-Zavorotny, Myroslav; Various cemeteries throughout Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, United States.

(2) "New Hampshire, Hillsborough County, Manchester, Cemetery Records, 1800-2007:  digital images FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org: accessed 1 December 2012).  Kenneth C. Spaulding.  May 19, 2001; citing Cemetery Records. Obituaries, Abbott, Arnold L.-Zavorotny, Myroslav; Various cemeteries throughout Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, United States.

(3) "New Hampshire, Hillsborough County, Manchester, Cemetery Records, 1800-2007:  digital images FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org: accessed 1 December 2012).  Charlotte Spaulding.  June 24, 2007; citing Cemetery Records. Obituaries, Abbott, Arnold L.-Zavorotny, Myroslav; Various cemeteries throughout Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, United States.

(4) "New Hampshire, Hillsborough County, Manchester, Cemetery Records, 1800-2007:  digital images FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org: accessed 1 December 2012).  Charles W. Spaulding.  June 26, 2006; citing Cemetery Records. Obituaries, Abbott, Arnold L.-Zavorotny, Myroslav; Various cemeteries throughout Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, United States.

(5) "New Hampshire, Hillsborough County, Manchester, Cemetery Records, 1800-2007:  digital images FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org: accessed 1 December 2012).  Henry Spaulding.  December 8, 2006; citing Cemetery Records. Obituaries, Abbott, Arnold L.-Zavorotny, Myroslav; Various cemeteries throughout Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, United States.

(6) "New Hampshire, Hillsborough County, Manchester, Cemetery Records, 1800-2007:  digital images FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org: accessed 1 December 2012).  Thomas Spaulding.  April 2, 1998; citing Cemetery Records. Obituaries, Abbott, Arnold L.-Zavorotny, Myroslav; Various cemeteries throughout Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, United States.